Body language says a lot about how a person feels about themselves. If you see a slumped-over person, that could mean that they’re shy. A person who is standing upright may be more confident. How a person uses their body can demonstrate their self-confidence and how they want others to see them. You can learn more about body language at BetterHelp. You might not be aware of what non-verbal messages you’re sending others, but it helps to educate yourself on the topic. Here is what your body language may say about you.

Foot-tapping, nail-biting, sweating or shaking

When a person has anxiety, you may see it in their body language. Anxious people tend to have trouble sitting still. A person may tap their foot, bite their nails or start sweating. You may notice their hands shaking if they’re experiencing anxiety. Sometimes anxious people have trouble getting words out. If the person is panicking, they could have difficulty saying anything. Anxiety can manifest in the body in a variety of ways.

Slouching, averting eye contact, crossing arms

If a person is slumped over and averting eye contact or crossing their arms, they could suffer from social anxiety. They may feel awkward talking to others, and this body language communicates that. When a person is doing these behaviors, it could also indicate that they’re bored. The individual is uninterested in what’s happening around them and disengaged.

Staring vacantly, looking sleepy, moving slowly

You may notice a person staring off into the distance, but it’s unclear what they see. Their eyes look glazed over. That individual could be suffering from depression. When you’re depressed, your thoughts can consume you. It’s difficult to concentrate on anything other than your negative feelings. That can contribute to appearing distracted. People who are feeling depressed often move slowly or appear sleepy. These are non-verbal signs that a person could be depressed.

Appearing tense, clenching fists or jaw, turning red

People who are experiencing anger show it in their bodies. An individual may tense up. Their muscles are tight. Their faces turn a shade of red, even though they’re unaware of it. People who try to contain their anger may not be able to do so, and it comes out in their bodies. Some people tighten their fists to keep the anger inside, while others clench their jaws. You can observe that a person is mad by how they carry themselves.

Pacing, fidgeting, and appearing animated

Individuals who have ADHD have a hard time sitting still. They may pace back and forth, get in and out of their seats, or fidget. If a person cannot contain their body’s energy, it could mean that they have ADHD. When you can’t focus, it shows in your body language. When you notice a fidgeting or animated person, it doesn’t necessarily mean they have ADHD. You could be watching someone who is in a manic episode. Individuals with bipolar disorder have a lot of energy when they’re in a state of mania. They could have trouble sitting still or find themselves talking a lot. There can be some overlap between the symptoms of ADHD and mania. Both individuals can talk quickly and a lot. The difference between the two conditions is that a person with ADHD constantly has rapid speech, while individuals with bipolar disorder vacillate between having excessive energy and feeling depressed. They may speak quickly when they’re manic, but their speech is slower when they’re in a depressive state.

Body language shows a lot about you

No matter what conditions you have or what emotions you’re experiencing, your body tends to communicate them. That can be helpful to those around you. If you’re depressed, you might be afraid to ask for help. However, your body demonstrates how you feel. If loved ones notice that you’re hurting, they have the opportunity to talk to you about it because of your body language. Sometimes, a person tries to conceal their emotions, but their body language reveals them despite their efforts to hide. It could be one of the key components to helping people understand themselves and what they need to do to get better.

Learn about body language in therapy

Therapists are excellent observers and understand the nuances of body language. If you see a mental health professional and you’re slouching in your seat, they might ask why that is. They want to understand what your body language is communicating. A therapist won’t assume anything but rather ask questions based on their observations. You can also learn ways to be more aware of your body. Some therapists help their clients practice mindfulness, which helps with body awareness. Therapy (whether it’s online or in your local area) can be a great way to learn more about how you express yourself to others.

Body language says a lot about how a person feels about themselves. If you see a slumped-over person, that could mean that they’re shy. A person who is standing upright may be more confident. How a person uses their body can demonstrate their self-confidence and how they want others to see them. You can learn more about body language at BetterHelp. You might not be aware of what non-verbal messages you’re sending others, but it helps to educate yourself on the topic. Here is what your body language may say about you.

Foot-tapping, nail-biting, sweating or shaking

When a person has anxiety, you may see it in their body language. Anxious people tend to have trouble sitting still. A person may tap their foot, bite their nails or start sweating. You may notice their hands shaking if they’re experiencing anxiety. Sometimes anxious people have trouble getting words out. If the person is panicking, they could have difficulty saying anything. Anxiety can manifest in the body in a variety of ways.

Slouching, averting eye contact, crossing arms

If a person is slumped over and averting eye contact or crossing their arms, they could suffer from social anxiety. They may feel awkward talking to others, and this body language communicates that. When a person is doing these behaviors, it could also indicate that they’re bored. The individual is uninterested in what’s happening around them and disengaged.

Staring vacantly, looking sleepy, moving slowly

You may notice a person staring off into the distance, but it’s unclear what they see. Their eyes look glazed over. That individual could be suffering from depression. When you’re depressed, your thoughts can consume you. It’s difficult to concentrate on anything other than your negative feelings. That can contribute to appearing distracted. People who are feeling depressed often move slowly or appear sleepy. These are non-verbal signs that a person could be depressed.

Appearing tense, clenching fists or jaw, turning red

People who are experiencing anger show it in their bodies. An individual may tense up. Their muscles are tight. Their faces turn a shade of red, even though they’re unaware of it. People who try to contain their anger may not be able to do so, and it comes out in their bodies. Some people tighten their fists to keep the anger inside, while others clench their jaws. You can observe that a person is mad by how they carry themselves.

Pacing, fidgeting, and appearing animated

Individuals who have ADHD have a hard time sitting still. They may pace back and forth, get in and out of their seats, or fidget. If a person cannot contain their body’s energy, it could mean that they have ADHD. When you can’t focus, it shows in your body language. When you notice a fidgeting or animated person, it doesn’t necessarily mean they have ADHD. You could be watching someone who is in a manic episode. Individuals with bipolar disorder have a lot of energy when they’re in a state of mania. They could have trouble sitting still or find themselves talking a lot. There can be some overlap between the symptoms of ADHD and mania. Both individuals can talk quickly and a lot. The difference between the two conditions is that a person with ADHD constantly has rapid speech, while individuals with bipolar disorder vacillate between having excessive energy and feeling depressed. They may speak quickly when they’re manic, but their speech is slower when they’re in a depressive state.

Body language shows a lot about you

No matter what conditions you have or what emotions you’re experiencing, your body tends to communicate them. That can be helpful to those around you. If you’re depressed, you might be afraid to ask for help. However, your body demonstrates how you feel. If loved ones notice that you’re hurting, they have the opportunity to talk to you about it because of your body language. Sometimes, a person tries to conceal their emotions, but their body language reveals them despite their efforts to hide. It could be one of the key components to helping people understand themselves and what they need to do to get better.

Learn about body language in therapy

Therapists are excellent observers and understand the nuances of body language. If you see a mental health professional and you’re slouching in your seat, they might ask why that is. They want to understand what your body language is communicating. A therapist won’t assume anything but rather ask questions based on their observations. You can also learn ways to be more aware of your body. Some therapists help their clients practice mindfulness, which helps with body awareness. Therapy (whether it’s online or in your local area) can be a great way to learn more about how you express yourself to others.

Photo by Andriyko Podilnyk on Unsplash

Writers Credit – Marie Miguel Biography

Marie Miguel has been a writing and research expert for nearly a decade, covering a variety of health- related topics. Currently, she is contributing to the expansion and growth of a free online mental health resource with BetterHelp.com. With an interest and dedication to addressing stigmas associated with mental health, she continues to specifically target subjects related to anxiety and depression.

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